Documentary Domesticity, 2022 (8min) short film


In society, we are often bombarded with images of violence, drugs, and death in the Black community. When we do see ourselves reflected positively in the media, often times it is the result of exploitation, Black capitalism, and material culture. It is revolutionary to romanticize everyday Black life, it is radical to find poetry in the mundane.


Documentary Domesticity is the idea of showcasing the humanity and interior lives of Black people. In following the tradition of 20th and 21st century African American artists such as Carrie Mae Weems and Roy Decarvara, I attempt to reclaim my memories. Through a series of archival photos, videos, and interviews with four young Chicago artists, I hope to challenge the way we think about the preservation of our neighborhoods, histories, and interior lives especially within this digital age.


The idea for an archival project surrounding Black memory and preservation originated while studying abroad in Paris, France, and visiting many historic museums and cultural spaces. While away, I grew more aware of how important it is to preserve the spaces, works, and ideas of African peoples and other people of color throughout art history. Though Chicago has a rich history, in comparison to Paris, it is not viewed as a historical place due to the lack of preservation of Black cultural spaces. Through this short film, I invite you into my world. I hope to engage with audiences about their preconceptions and representations of Chicago and reflect on the systems they benefit from. I invite everyone to think about every space as being a historical space and develop new ways to preserve your memories.


This project Is sponsored by Oberlin College, XARTS Fund Winter Term 21-22


Featuring Interviews from -

Ryuan Johnson

Justin Howard also known as SPEW

Blake Saint David

Josh Johnson


Thank you for watching.

UTOPIA, digital zine, 2021

For my final project In Graphic Design I, at the Paris College of Art. In this zine, I used my own photos in collaboration with photos that my friends took of "everyday life" In Paris. I asked them to show me their version of utopia - utopia being a mindset and a feeling that you can't describe. This zine was Inspired by the reality of each of us being foreigners and unfamiliar with life in a new country. The zine is short, personal, and a way to process these new experiences.


UTOPIA ZINE 2021.pdf

Through the Loop: Chicago's Youth Artist Revolution x Jip Gallery 2021

Overpriced grocery stores, hipster art galleries, and quirky bars that now crowd gentrified Chicago neighborhoods do not reflect Chicago’s youth experience or create a welcoming environment for emerging Black artists. This displacement creates tension and misrepresentation of Chicago’s young artist scene. Through the Loop: Chicago’s Youth Artist Revolution is a mixed-media virtual exhibition that explores themes of youth displacement, positionality, and activism. Chicago’s youth are often faced with the harsh realities of their neighborhoods changing, unequal heavily policing of Chicago Public Schools, and forced adulthood.


This exhibition aims to give visual representation and raise global awareness of Chicago’s underground youth DIY art scene. By highlighting diverse, new artists within this space that possess a variety of intersectional identities, platforms (@CTAFITS_, @BraidedMag), and unique cultural experiences, I aim to foster greater community within this scene and dissolve the personal/public barrier within the digital world. Chicago’s youth are powerful, creative, and resilient individuals that create transformative, innovative art and events that influence youth culture around the world. Fashion House (postponed due to COVID-19), a runway show featuring six up-and-coming designers, along with live musical performances hosted by the Museum of Contemporary Art is just one example of how this scene is home to many multi-dimensional, experimental artists that move to beat their own drum.